Programme for Sunday 9th

SUNDAY 9 IN FEILDING

 

MORNING TEA WITH PETER WELLS –

THE LIFE OF A WORKING WRITER

9:30 – 10:30am: FEILDING LIBRARY

Over almost thirty years Peter Wells has been writing books novels, books of short stories, a play, film scripts and works of nonfiction. He has won prizes and missed out on prizes.

Writing is his passion and he says, ‘I am not myself without writing. Words are my friends – the way I interpret the world.’

’ Earlier, Peter had a film career which included crusading documentaries which were successful in saving and celebrating both Art Deco Napier and the Mighty Civic Theatre. He is popularly described as having ‘saved the Civic’. In 1999 he co-founded, along with fellow writer Stephanie Johnson, the enormously successful Auckland Writers Festival.

‘But,’ says Wells, ‘you could set a clock by my daily rituals. After a cup of strong coffee I am at my desk by 9.30am. Then my real world begins.’

 

SO, YOU WANT TO BE A SUCCESSFUL ROMANCE WRITER?

10:45am – 12:30pm: FEILDING LIBRARY

A surprising number of NZ romance novelists are successful overseas.

Romance Writers of New Zealand president, Bronwen Evans,

is one of them. In this session she talks about what it takes, and debunks some myths about the genre.

 

WRITING FOR CHILDREN

10:45am – 12:30pm: FEILDING LIBRARY

Recipient of the Margaret Mahy medal for services to children’s literature, Barbara Else presents a workshop covering some important aspects to consider when writing children’s fiction – structure, voice and understanding the audience.

 

WHAT IS CREATIVE NON-FICTION? Q&A

12: 30 – 1:30am: FEILDING LIBRARY

(BYO LUNCH) An opportunity to get questions answered.

Thom Conroy discusses what constitutes creative non-fiction

and how it relates to other non-fiction writing.

 

JOANNE DRAYTON ON THE SEARCH FOR ANNE PERRY

1:00 – 2:00pm: FEILDING LIBRARY

In 1954 an obsessive relationship between two teenaged girls leads to a murder that shocks Christchurch and the nation.

When biographer Joanne Drayton tracked down crime writer

Anne Perry, she was invited into a hidden life.

Joanne Drayton shares the interviews that led to the book,

The Search for Anne Perry.

KEEPING THE READER’S INTEREST – THE IMPORTANCE OF PACE

1:30 – 2:30pm: FEILDING LIBRARY

For a reader, the difference between a boring book and one that’s hard to put down, is often a matter of Pace.

Editor, tutor and mentor Lesley Marshall discusses how a writer can pace the right degree of action and intensity throughout a manuscript, so that readers feel compelled to find out what happens next.

 

LET’S NOT DROWN IN RESEARCH!

2:45 – 3:45pm: FEILDING LIBRARY

Research can be fascinating and infuriating.

Over-researching can be a real stumbling block to making progress on a writing project.

Senior lecturer in Creative Writing Thom Conroy looks at how we can pull ourselves out of the mire and get on with the project.

 

DISCOVERING OPTIMISM THROUGH WRITING

2:45 – 3:30pm: FEILDING LIBRARY

Author Jan Pryor talks about the healing power of writing.

After Alexander is a story of triumph over loss, and of optimism offered from a non-religious perspective.

Jan Pryor offers hope to parents who have lost a child, to those who fear losing a child, and to anyone who has suffered the loss

of a loved one.

 

GETTING YOUR MANUSCRIPT TO THE FINISHLINE

4:00 – 5:30pm: FEILDING LIBRARY

In this session, Craig Cliff, Carole Brungar, Norman Bilbrough and Dave Haywood talk about what it takes to work through a major writing project to completion.

There’s more than one ‘right way’ to achieve the goal. Aimed to inspire aspiring writers to meet the challenges and get the manuscript done.

 

SUNDAY 9 IN PALMERSTON NORTH

LIFE – WRITE BALANCE [Cancelled]

11:00am – 12:00pm: PALMERSTON NORTH LIBRARY

Chinese born author and poet, Enya Chadderton knows the challenges faced by creative women who juggle family life as a working mother while writing creatively in two languages.

Enya is a chartered accountant, a movie producer, and president of the New Zealand Television and Film Association Inc. whose poetry book in Chinese was a best seller in China in 2016. [Cancelled]

 

A BOOK SELLER’S PERSPECTIVE ON READERS’ TRENDS AND SELLING BOOKS

12:30 – 1:30pm: PALMERSTON NORTH LIBRARY 

What sorts of books do people buy? Veteran independent bookseller Bruce McKenzie gives readers and writers his broad overview of book-buyers’ trends – and how does a bookseller choose which books to sell?

 

WORD-PULSE-RHYTHM

1:00 – 2:30pm: SHED 23 PALMERSTON NORTH

Jennifer Moss Music proudly presents a highly hands-on and practical workshop for poets and spoken word performers.

Dive into, explore, and gain valuable understanding of beat and rhythm and how they weave, support, invigorate and inspire words. This vibrant session will be enormous fun.

 

BRIGIT WILLIAMS – PUBLISHER

1:45 – 2:45pm: PALMERSTON NORTH LIBRARY

Brigit Williams speaks about her decades as an independent New Zealand publisher, producing some of the best NZ non-fiction authors. Among the accolades for the calibre of her service to New Zealand authors, Brigit Williams was awarded Member of the Order of the British Empire for services to book publishing, and Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit  for services to publishing.

 

FIGHTING ON ALL FRONTS: WHAT IT TAKES FOR WRITING TO CHANGE ANYTHING.

3:00 – 4:20pm: PALMERSTON NORTH LIBRARY

Journalist, author, academic and researcher Max Rashbrooke is a senior associate of the Institute for Governance and Policy Studies at Victoria University of Wellington, with research interests in wealth inequality and open government.

As a journalist, he has written for outlets in Britain and New Zealand including the Guardian, the National Business Review and Metro. He has twice been the recipient of the Bruce Jesson Senior Journalism Award.

 

FREE TO WRITE –

4:30 – 6:30pm: PALMERSTON NORTH LIBRARY

Readings from writers settling in NZ, after leaving places where daily life was a risk. This session is chaired by author, editor and representative of PEN International (NZ) Lesley Marshall.

Writers among new immigrants of diverse nationalities and ethnicities share their stories. Many find that writing the narrative of their experiences helps healing, opens new horizons and allows them to move forward with a new peace.